Tag: the games that guide us

The Games that Guide Us – Night in the Woods and Depression

Much like anxiety, depression as a mental health consideration has entered the public consciousness to a greater degree in the past couple of decades than it has in the more distant past. Also, similarly to anxiety, it is obvious that depression has existed in humans for much longer than we have had the words to describe it or the tools to diagnose and treat it. A somewhat common perception seems to be that anxiety and depression go hand in hand enough that they are often mentioned together in conversations regarding mental health. While there can be some degree of observable correlation there, the two conditions should be considered separately in terms of how they affect an individual’s perceptions of and reactions to reality.

The topic of how mental health affects how a person perceives and interacts with the world around them is one of the central concepts expressed in the game Night in the Woods. The plot of the game, written by Scott Benson and Bethany Hockenberry, revolves around Mae Borowski, a 20-year-old woman returning to her hometown of Possum Springs after dropping out of college for initially undisclosed reasons. During the course of the game’s narrative, Mae experiences a number of interconnected mental health issues that result in her version of reality being affected. While there are a number of games out there that also use altered mental states as a narrative tool, Night in the Woods uses a combination of the narrative representation of Mae’s mental state alongside adventure game exploration and platforming in order to allow the player to participate in the overarching depression that constantly layers atop Mae’s reality.

Continue reading “The Games that Guide Us – Night in the Woods and Depression”

The Games that Guide Us – Crisis Management and Anxiety

Anxiety has been something that I have had to deal with throughout my life. It was there even before I knew what anxiety was, or that it wasn’t something that everyone felt, or even what the full extent of my reactions to it could even be. I’ve written about it before, but I wanted to include it specifically in this series of articles and explore it in a different way than I have in the past. In my previous article about anxiety, I wrote about why games are a common coping mechanism for those who experience it. In this series, I wanted to approach things from a different point of view. Here, I will be examining how games can be used to show someone who has not experienced this kind of anxiety directly what goes into those feelings and thought processes, and how those of us who do experience it develop coping mechanisms and manage the things that happen in our lives.

It is no real secret that anxiety is becoming a greater and greater issue in modern society; yet it is something that not many people who haven’t experienced it are able to fully comprehend. It goes beyond simply being worried about something, and beyond even the idea of something bad happening in the future. Anxiety is a combination of mental and physical reactions that can make a person paralyzed in the face of a real or imagined crisis. Oftentimes, those of us who are experiencing extreme anxiety are faced with the difficult choice of dealing with what is going on in the present or stockpiling our resources (whether mental, physical, or emotional), to deal with whatever the next crisis will be. It doesn’t even matter if we are unaware what the next crisis is, we just know there is going to be one.

Continue reading “The Games that Guide Us – Crisis Management and Anxiety”