Tag: game mechanics

Opening Turn Podcast – Episode 5: Months of Planning Followed by Eight Hours of Sheer Chaos

Hey everyone! Here is Episode 5 of the Opening Turn Podcast!

This is the final in a five-part series about the creation, writing, planning, and running of live action roleplaying events. In this episode, Riley Seaman and I bring together all the concepts we have been exploring in our previous installments and give a rundown of how they tie into the day of the event itself! As always, safety, adaptability, and player experience are key to making the event as fun and successful for everyone as possible.

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Opening Turn Podcast – Episode 4: He Who Playtests His Own Game Has A Fool For A GM

Hey everyone! Here is the (slightly late) episode 4 of the Opening Turn podcast!

This is the fourth in a five (or more!) episode series over live-action roleplaying. Here, Riley Seaman and I talk about various game mechanics and how they support the overall feel of the game and the environment that the players are interacting with. We talk about existing game mechanics, levels of player interaction with the environment, safety, and, as always, making sure the players are having a good experience.

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Dealing with the Fourth Horseman: Death and Game Mechanics

castlevania-symphony-of-the-night-alucard-death[SPOILER WARNING: This article will be talking about the game mechanics of permanent plot-related character death in video games. As such, you should assume that any game that I mention will be a game in which people die or vanish from the party for long periods of time. I’ll try not to use games any more recent than a year or two old, but still, read this article at your own risk.]

Death. Final, absolute, cold hard death. It’s sort of an oddball thing to handle in video games. Why? Because video games have a very unique point of view when it comes to death. In video games, death is rarely ever final. Death, in regards to the main character, represents the loss condition. It is the point where you say, “I did not complete the level, so I’m going to start over and try again.” Usually, this is sufficient, because the player character is the one who you generally have to worry about dying. Obviously, this is because the entire game is constructed around more and more difficult-to-avoid ways of making the main character die.

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